{picture book} wonder-full

Just in time for a baby shower gift, one of my favorites (I have a print on my wall) came out with a new book: not that I wouldn’t have gifted the recently released board book version of Dream Animals (my review). The Wonderful Things You Will Be by Emily Winfield Martin  Random House, 2015….

{comic} BFFs

Little Robot by Ben Hatke First Second, 2015. Advanced Reader Copy (thank you First Second/Net Galley) in exchange for a fair review. When a little girl finds an adorable robot in the woods, she presses a button and accidentally activates him for the first time. Now, she finally has a friend. But the big, bad…

{comic} this one summer

If the summer narrative isn’t your glass of lemonade, it isn’t mine either, but I had to see what all the raving was about and I was very pleasantly surprised. Make it your book club read. Make it the first comic you’ve decided to read if you have been harboring a mistaken belief that comics…

{comics} atypical

“a sweeping tale of one young family fighting to find their place in the universe.” Saga : Volumes One & Two by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples Image Comics 2012 & 2013 respectively. This waiting for the next volume to come off hold at the Library is excruciating. It isn’t that I do not have other…

{bookishness + diversity in lit} #diversiverse

I mentioned BookLust‘s readerly challenge on Friday in the links.  I promptly got distracted by the weekend and one of those job interviews you’d like to be hired after. But I have signed up! yesterday…And now I am officially posting about it! As an eloquent Aarti (of BookLust) writes: None of us lives in a monochromatic world,…

{book} imagine Beekle

The Adventures of Beekle, The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat (Little, Brown & Co. 2014) On a magical island, a creature is born and left to imagine the friend made especially for them. Nameless, the creature waits in increasing despair while the others meet their matches. The creature in Dan Santat’s The Adventures of Beekle is…

{book} an antidote

Day Twenty-Seven: I’m Bored By Michael Ian Black  Illustrated by Debbie Ridpath Ohi  Simon & Schuster for Young Readers 2012 The potato was unexpected. I did not read the inside jacket copy. I didn’t even notice the back cover. Browsing shelves, I saw the front cover, remembered it’s popularity when it was released, and added it…

{book} mother’s

Day Twenty-Six: My Mother’s Sari By Sandhya Rao  illustrated by Nina Sabnani NorthSouth 2006 Illustrated using mixed-media, My Mother’s Sari opens with the endpapers bearing instructions in how to don a sari. The photographed human model’s person painted over in the manner of the characters we will soon meet in the story. Whether it is in…

{book} a present nostalgia

Day Twenty-Five: Wait! Wait!  By Hatsue Nakawaki Illustrated by Komako Sakai Translated by Yuki Kaneko Enchanted Lion Books 2013 Wait! Wait! is an ideal book for young children that gently follows their rhythms and preoccupations. With a text of few words, frequent repetitions, and delicate illustrations with which children will quickly identify, the book follows a young…

{book} birth stories

Day Twenty-Four: The Baby on the Way  by Karen English Illus. Sean Qualls  Farrar Straus Giroux 2005 The Baby on the Way was not what I was expecting. I thought it was going to be about a boy who is feeling anxiety about a new baby sibling on the way. And maybe Jamal is and maybe…

{book} a red knit cap girl to know

Day Twenty-Three: Red Knit Cap Girl and Red Knit Cap Girl to the Rescue  by Naoko Stoop  Megan Tingley Books/Little, Brown and Co 2012 and 2013 respectively I would start with “charming story,” but what captures my attention is the medium in which Naoko Stoop illustrates Red Knit Cap Girl: Acrylic, ink, and pencil on plywood. The gradation…

{book} brotherhood

Day Twenty-Two: Oh, Brother! By Nikki Grimes  Illustration by Mike Benny Greenwillow Books/HarperCollins 2008 It’s bad enough that Xavier’s new stepbrother, Chris, has moved into Xavier’s room, but now it looks like he’s also trying to steal Mami by being the perfect kid. […] In twenty powerful poems, two strangers learn to become brothers. Nikki Grimes…