"review" · Children's · comics/graphic novels · recommend · Tales

{picture book} Hatke’s creatures

JuliasHouseJulia’s House for Lost Creatures by Ben Hatke

First Second 2014.

When Julia’s house finds a new place to settle, she puts a sign out for lost creatures to combat her own sense of loneliness. But now a new conflict has arisen and a list of chores is her solution.

Ben Hatke, whom we have long since learned is a genius with young heroines and illustrated robots, impresses with his more earthbound whimsy. Julia’s house is charming and its inhabitants excite the imagination—and the fine digressions into lore.

Julia's Home for Lost Creatures II

julias house for lost creatures 2

The color palette, style, energy (I do love Julia’s hair)…Hatke manages a delightful picture book that is sweetly entertaining. And what caregiver will be able to resist a conversation on the way we can participate more harmoniously as family?—which is how we talk chores in our own creature-filled household. A lesson (besides “look at the mermaid doing the dishes, sweetie!”) that I appreciated was Julia’s understanding of her own limitations and abilities; which seem to frequent Hatke’s work. The house is too quiet, she opts for hospitality; it becomes too much for her, she asks for help. Hatke’s heroines are a resourceful lot. I was totally geeked to see Julia had a workshop.

Oh, and if you were a bit bummed by the idea that one of Hatke’s robots would not make an appearance? You’ll find a lovely invention there at the end.

julia's house chores

Julia’s House for Lost Creatures is a great little book about community. It is also a great place to join Hatke in the workings of the imagination. I look forward to what Hatke will have for us next. (another Zita??).

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Not to be categorized as girls only and it spans a good age range. I’m thinking about this one for a storytime and encourage listeners to draw their own creature (and what chore would suit them best?). You should also take this book as a hint to check out Zita Spacegirl if you’ve yet done so.

Hatke did a blog tour called “Ben Hatke’s Bestiary of Lost Creatures” that may interest you.

 {images belong to Ben Hatke}

"review" · Children's · comics/graphic novels · concenter · juvenile lit · recommend · Tales

{comic} revealed

Hidden : A Child’s Story of the Holocaust

Written by Loïc Dauvillier; Illustrated by Marc Lizano

Color by Greg Salsedo; Translated from the French by Alexis Siegel

First Second Books, 2014.

Ages 6-10; Grades 1-5.

 Encouraged to talk about her evident sadness, a grandmother shares her memories long hidden about her experience as a child in 1942 Paris. Opening in the late hours of evening (the dark) in the privacy of a home, steeped in themes of hiding and silence, the novel will eventually affect a catharsis that moves the reader to compassion and tears. And yet, it will be a story the reader will loathe to tuck away and forget.

The continual exchange between grandmother and granddaughter Elsa escapes the contrived as the young Elsa struggles to understand how a young Dounia Cohen’s life is upended by the horror of a mass eradication of Jews in Paris. Elsa alongside Dounia wonders at the lies adults will tell, the sudden cruelty of her neighbors or their heroics, the loss of a parent, the importance of a courageous community. The gently told story does not skirt the horror and sorrow. The portrayal of the injustice Jews and their sympathizers faced honors the intellect of a grade-schooler. The sequences are those Hidden’s young audience would understand, the fear and heartache of losing their parents, schoolroom humiliations, inexplicable displays public violence… They will find contemporary relevance in subjects of honesty, loyalty, identity, bullying, and loss. I was struck by how contemporary the novel makes the holocaust–how present. I was moved by the silence after that final narrative line at the bottom of page 68; how its said into the quiet; how Elsa sleeps in innocence.

One of the marvels of Diary of Anne Frank is how the reader connects with her youth. Elsa’s sympathies reflect her youthful audience. Dounia as young and old help them cope. She is the wise grandmother and the child witness. She shows fear and regret and incredible courage. The story reinforces what is right and good without the heavy-handed messaging.

Dauvillier understands the power of the oral historian in couching his story. He creates a connection to the present and the past not only through a framework and a paced movement from one to the other, but in reemphasizing the connections visually. Elsa is the unfreckled version of her grandmother when young. And while the story is told, Elsa is safe in the arms of the older Dounia/Simone. Hidden closes out of doors in the daylight in a tender exchange of reconciliation that forgives the silence and celebrates sharing the unspeakable.

I admit to being uncertain about the art when the book first came out, and I did find following the text a bit tricky at first. I appreciate, however, the accessibility of the cartoon work. Lizano manages the expressive without unbalancing the gentility in the narrative. He provides meaningful settings even when the image shouldn’t be rendered in anything more than words. He provides meaningful renderings when the language for child-audiences are inadequate. A lot of frames are close-ups, emphasizing subjectivity and a sympathy with the character and situation. The viewer is just as often cast as an observer of distances and emptiness, of the foreign. Lizano and Salsedo are fearless with darkening tints and shadows.

 

I was deeply impressed by Hidden. It approaches a difficult narrative with a caution that does not underestimate its young readership*. It leaves an impression that is empowering and interventionist, rather than crippling—an impression not only meant for the youngest of us.

Hidden would be a great graphic novel for intergenerational story time, and I shouldn’t think it only for educational venues or historic commemorations. Put this one on the any-day shelf.

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*something I see more in translated European texts.

{images belong to Marc Lizano}

"review" · Children's · comics/graphic novels · fiction · mystery · Picture book · recommend · Tales

{picture/book} rules of summer

Rules of Summer by Shaun Tan. Arthur A. Levine (Scholastic) 2013.

 “Never break the rules. Especially, if you don’t understand them.”–back cover copy.

Rules of Summer, in its most simplified description, is about two brothers’ summer adventures. The story is told by Shaun Tan so there is the surreal and the incredible wordless impact of his imagery. Fans of Tan’s work should already have the book read or on their radar. If you don’t know Tan (for whatever reason), you may begin here.

“This is what I learned last summer” is how the story begins. And it is fair to assume the voice is that of the younger brother, but as the story progresses there are moments where the elder might have inspired a new rule as well. As it is, each of the double-page spreads “tells of an event and the lesson learned*.” And as the publisher also observes, “By turns, these events become darker and more sinister.”

Like the past tense framing of the story alludes, some rules aren’t realized until after they are broken. We understand how much is left unknown and unspoken and the genius of the book is how much it reflects these notions. There is a very very clever brain behind all the beauty on the page.

I mentioned surreal, and indeed there is a strangeness to the realist settings, but there is also a surreality to the story itself. The dark and the whimsical coincide, the summery tones in the color also have texture, and it opens with a more ominous tone than it closes.

Rules of Summer also opens on the title page with the younger running; you can practically hear him calling out to his elder brother not to leave him behind. His older brother doesn’t leave him behind—which is terribly important to the narrative. The summer ends and the sun is setting outside the darkening room where the boys watch television together and the walls hold drawings that commemorate their adventures.

The books dedication reads “for the little and the big,” which is precisely who it is for. Also, a good book for brothers and for people who have a folkloric imagination.

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*Would be amusing to take a double-page spread and try to write a story that would inspire that image.

{images belong to Shaun Tan; read more about the book via Tan’s site, here}

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read in participation w/ #Diversiverseamdu150

"review" · Children's · concenter · Illustrator · Picture book · recommend · Tales

{illustrator} yuyi morales

30 days of pbI occasionally share an illustrator who has caught my eye. See the above “picture book list” for other illustrators highlighted on this blog. For ’30 Days of Picture Books’,“Day Six” features three books and an Illustrator’s Spotlight!

Day Thirty:  Little Night; Just in Case: A Trickster Tale & Spanish Alphabet Book; and  Nino Wrestles the World .

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yuyi Illustration-from-Georgia-for-Molly
from Amy Novesky’s Georgia in Hawaii

yuyi moralesYuyi Morales is an author, artist, and puppet maker and was the host of her own Spanish-language radio program for children. Her books have won numerous awards and citations including the Americas Award, the Jane Addams Award, the Christopher Award, three Pura Belpre Medals, and three Pura Belpre Honors. She divides her time between the San Francisco area and Veracruz Mexico.

“I was born in the city of flowers, Xalapa, Mexico, where the springs came out from the sand, or so the story says. […]When I grow old I dream in becoming a professional liar. You know, those kind of people that tell stories and everybody goes, “Ahh, Ohh!” (“me”).

from an interview with Cynthia Leitich Smith at Cynsations: “From the books I borrowed, I learned how to make handmade-paper, and baskets, and how to bind books, carve rubber stamps, and build puppets and make them walk. But mostly I learned that everything I always wanted to learn I could find it in a book.

From Marisa Montes’ Los Gatos Black on Halloween
From Marisa Montes’ Los Gatos Black on Halloween

“From books in the library, I fell in love with children’s literature and their art. I awed at the sight of illustrations and studied picture book after picture book, wondering at how illustrators could bring such a magic to their work.” read the complete interview here.

Her picture books:  Harvesting Hope: The Story of Cesar Chavez, illus. for Kathleen Krull (HMH 2003); Just a Minute!: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book (Chronicle 2003); Los Gatos Black on Halloween, Illus. for Marisa Montes (Henry Holt and Co 2006); Just in Case: A Trickster Tale and Spanish Alphabet Book (Roaring Brook 2008); My Abuelita, illus. for Tony Johnston (HMH 2009); Georgia in Hawaii: When Georgia O’Keeffe Painted What She Pleased, illus. for Amy Novesky (HMH 2012); Ladder to the Moon, illus for Maya Soetoro-Ng (Candlewick 2011); Little Night (Roaring Brook 2007); Floating on Mama’s Song/Flotando En L Cancion de Mama, illus for Laura Lacamara (Katherine Tegen 2010); Sand Sister, illus. for Amanda White (Barefoot 2004); Viva Frida (Roaring Brook 2014)

bicy_animation

“I was born in Mexico, the eldest of four children. I always drew. I copied from my family’s photographs, I drew my relatives’ faces, and I looked at myself in the mirror to draw myself again and again. I was also interested in sports. My two sisters and I developed into competitive swimmers; we traveled a lot, and trained with our team twice a day, even during winter. Some times the water was so cold that we could not curl our fingers or lift our arms to comb our hair afterwards. As I grew up, it was time to choose a career. Even though I loved to draw and create, it never occurred to me that I could become an artist. Instead I went to the University to study to be a P.E. teacher and Psychologist. Soon after I graduated, I became a swimming coach. And that is what I was doing when things came to a big change.”–Aline Pereira’s interview w/ Morales, Paper Tigers (here)

Yuyi Morales’ artwork is intriguing, but learning more about her and her story you begin to confirm that sneaking suspicion you had that there is a vibrant, playful, and warm creator behind the work you’ve been admiring.

from Tony Johnston's My Abuelita
from Tony Johnston’s My Abuelita

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little night coverLittle Night by Yuyi Morales,

A Neal Porter Book/Roaring Book Press 2007

 Yuyi Morales plays with the getting-ready-for-bed story as Mother Sky tries to coax Little Night into a bathtub of stars. The sun sets, and the sky cools and darkens Mother Sky’s skirts as she bathes and dresses a child more interested in playing hide-and-seek.

Little Night hides in places wherein night would blend, with animals and hues like a little night. The color scheme moves from warm sunset reds, oranges, pinks to cooling and harder-surfaced reds to deepening into purples and blues. The evidence of brushwork is broad and sweeping, lending to the expansive quality of a tale set in the sky.

It is lovely to consider how the greatness of the sky and the night participate in each relatively small beings of the reader. Little Night appears both human child-size and large in the scale of villages, but Mother Sky is always large, but not looming on the page. The definitive thematic images are of Mother Sky’s domestic chores, seeking Little Night, and her holding Little Night on her lap. She is a comforting, caring presence. She’s also rendered quite beautiful.

little_night_vestirseaLittle Night is impish, and the whole interplay between Mother and Night is very sweet. It is also magical (shocking, I know), but the “dress crotched from clouds” is perfect, and that the “hair pins are stars,” named as they are placed in Little Night’s hair.

Little Night is probably an obvious choice for bedtime, and it is indeed one to nestle in with, but Little Night is not the only impish figure. The author isn’t putting Little Night to bed—it’s nighttime, it’s time for the child to be waking, to be bathed and dressed, fed and groomed, and given the moon as a ball with which to run out and play.

little nightOf course we all have times for sleeping and times for running wild and in sport. Little Night is for both of those times.

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just in case coverJust in Case: A Trickster Tale & Spanish Alphabet Book by Yuyi Morales, A Neal Porter Book/Roaring Book Press 2008

A new adventure with Señor Calavera following Just a Minute!: A Trickster Tale and Counting Book (Chronicle Books 2003)

After meeting  Señor Calavera (who has his own website), I know I am going to have to find Just a Minute! His efforts to find the perfect gifts for his dear friend Grandma Beetle was perfectly encantadora.

It is almost time for the Grandma Beetle’s birthday party and Señor Calavera is nearly ready to go, tie ironed, bike maintenance… Then Señor Zelmiro appears suggesting Señor Calavera should bring a gift. He has time. Unsure of what would make Grandma Beetle most happy to receive on her special day, Señor Calavera will choose gifts of every letter of the alphabet.

As he collects gifts alphabetically— Una Acordéon: An accordion for her to dance to. Bigotes: A mustache because she has none. Cosquillas: Tickles to make her laugh—Señor Zelmiro keeps egging him on, asking him if these are the gifts Grandma Beetle will really want. They are all good gifts, but what was the most precious? [one ring to rule them all?]

before text
before text

Señor Calavera worries, and time is running close to missing the party entirely.

The skeleton on his bicycle makes it one letter past xilografia before disaster strikes. Never fear, as you might guess, Señor Calavera does make it through the alphabet to find a gift precious to everyone at the birthday party.

before text
before text

The colors are as lively as the text, and as warm as the sentiment. The details are worth lingering over, little touches here and there; e.g. the bone texture of the skull beneath a differentiated layer of paint where it is decorated. The translucence of the ghost is beautifully done, lending Señor Zelmira a solid presence, the white dots lending a silvery sparkle (like in Grandma Beetle’s hair).

via Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast, by Yuyi Morales
via Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast, by Yuyi Morales

I was taken with the inclusion of the book resting beneath Señor Calavera’s hat in his bedroom: Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitude) [by Gabriel Garcia Marquez].

I was really taken with privileging all the text by not italicizing the Spanish language words. I should do a post on code-switching. No, the only italicizing was appropriate to the exclaimed (thus emphasized) ¡Quizás! (maybe or perhaps). Looking up the word Quizás led me to a YouTube video of Andrea Bocelli and Jennifer Lopez singing “Quizás, Quizás, Quizás.” Naturally, I want to share that link here. You’re welcome.

Natalya (2013)
Natalya (2013)

I mentioned I should do a post on code-switching, but I should really get Natalya to talk about it and her brief exchange with Poet Eduardo C. Corral on just whom bilingual picture books are really for?

Ignore the impulse to consider Just in Case a foreign language acquisition tool, and employ it as you’d do any picture book: as a tool of language acquisition. Natalya (nearly 14 now) and I will still occasionally indulge an alphabet game. The level of difficulty has been amped since she was 5, of course. But I wish we’d known xilografia back when, as ‘x’ can be the most limited alphabet game letter otherwise.  I wish we’d had this book back then.

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nino-wrestles-the-world coverNino Wrestles the World by Yuyi Morales, A Neal Porter Book/Roaring Brook Press 2013. Includes “About Lucha Libre”

nino ficha_lloronaIn the popular tradition of the “theatrical, action-packed style of professional wrestling” of Lucha Libre, Yuyi Morales pits Nino against some gnarly cultural bogey-men. Love the appearance La Llorona, how she comes on scene and is defeated. Every competitor’s bio (including pronunciations) decorate the end pages, even Las Hermanitas who prove to be Nino’s most challenging of competitors.

nino-wrestles-the-world-illustration-yuyi-moralesMorales enacts a fantastic production in colors, graphics, energy and imaginative play. An absolute must for entertainment alone. Second are the lessons in courage, play, and siblinghood.

nino hermanitas-for_chelsea2It reminds me a bit of Kel Gilligan’s Daredevil Stunt Show by Michael Buckley and Dan Santat (Harry N. Abrams 2012).

Start your Yuyi Morales collection, and if you have to start it somewhere, Nino Wrestles the World would be an excellent book with which to begin.

{all images belong to Yuyi Morales, check out her site here}

"review" · cinema · sci-fi/fantasy · Tales

{film} a winter’s tale that left me a bit cold

winter-s-tale-image05
Young Willa (Mckayla Twiggs) & Jessica Brown Findlay (Beverly Penn). spinning romantic tales.

The promise of an urban fantasy in director Akiva Goldsman’s Winter’s Tale (2014) was tempting. I have yet to read Mark Helprin’s 1983 novel of the same name, but I do not recall it being panned. Nor had I heard much about the critical reception of the film. I hadn’t sought it out. I figured Winter’s Tale would be an enchanting watch, I didn’t figure it for being so cloying. I spent most of the film digging around in my body for that necessary romantic bone—femur-sized preferably. I think I arrived at this film too many years too late.

The film opens with the riveting vocals of Jessica Brown Findlay (Sibyl of Downton Abbey) telling us about this belief that there is this “world behind the world where we are all connected” and how “time and distance are not what they appear to be.” Her voice is the world-builder where we have come to expect some moving and/or trending song to play over a time collapsing visual narrative (aka dumb show, theatrically speaking). I didn’t think I’d need to time the prologue, but I was thinking I should have long before the title appeared on screen. Maybe it was its lyricism that made the voice-over so lengthy and laden, or was it the necessity to situate the film’s premise.

winter's tale colin farrell
Colin Farrell as Peter Lake. …are you sure we shouldn’t just go now?…

Besides the title bearing the words Winter and Tale, Colin Farrell as the lead, and a white horse figuring in somewhere, this is the only other thing I knew about the film: Internet Movie Database’s proffered synopsis: which you should refrain from reading.

Set in 1916 New York, burglar Peter Lake (Farrell) falls in love with an heiress Beverly Penn (Findlay) during an attempted robbery. Unfortunately for them both, each are imperiled in their own way. He is being hunted by the convincingly evil and also ridiculously named gangster Pearly Soames (Russell Crowe). She is nearly-dead of consumption—a pulmonary disease the orphaned Peter’s immigrant parents were diagnosed with and refused entrance into New York.

It may be that in the truly magical world, Beverly is misdiagnosed with consumption, a prevalent disease at the time, because her symptoms are better suited towards her transitioning into a star—the after-life destination she is anticipating. The stars feature prominently, their lore, their connection to the universe. The film also draws from angel/demon and Native American mythologies.

Winters-Tale-screencaps-11

Winter’s Tale alludes to the interconnected, renaming, and shared history of every mythology in the opening. How it all plays out is the slow-reveal. By the time the tale begins to make real sense, you are near the close and understand why they had to be so mystifying—to compel you with the intrigue.  The other option is to compel you with the romance, which is the predestined sort, which may not be as compelling as the growing dread of unanticipated tragedy it could have supported better. Peter has to save Beverly somehow and how all that is to work out is the most mystifying of all.

The film is one to be patient with and of a certain humor. It has a dated feel already, and I am still in awe of how Colin Farrell can deliver the lines he does with such earnest sincerity. The awkward delivery in the film was in the editing.

A WINTER"S TALE

Winter’s Tale has a wonderful cast, great scenery…I think the offense arrives with understanding its potential to be a truly magical—what, because I think the failure is anticipating an adventure out of a standard memoir. I should check the filmographies for Lifetime network credentials. Winter’s Tale, as I understand it from the film, would make for a more interesting Indie-house attempt. Maybe someone could steampunk it—yes, let’s have a do-over.

The message of “true love gives life meaning” is a message of optimism an otherwise heartlessly harmful cultural landscape might find appealing. Only, you have to believe that the universe will still bend backwards for you, that the significant other hasn’t lost their miracle (or had it crushed) by the “agents of chaos.”

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winters_tale_640

….SPOILER…[[& of likely relevance to only those who’ve seen the film]] a conversation Sean and I had that is too hilarious not to share.  After we learn that Beverly is “the girl [his] miracle is for,” the word virginity occasionally became interchangeable w/ miracle. His virginity was going to save her, but I phooey the idea because it’s a him, not the other way ‘round. Turns out, Sean was right about the virginity-concept when she dies after losing her virginity which signifies the true love that grants him the power of reincarnation, which is really just resurrection and failure to age.

On a related note, her virginal love saves him, and he in turn saves the female child of a single mother. The world is stabilized once more.…SPOILER DONE ….

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Winter's_tale_(film)

Winter’s Tale (2014) Direction & Screenplay by Akiva Goldsman, Based on the novel Winter’s Tale by Mark Helprin, Produced by Goldsman, Marc E. Platt, Michael Tadross & Tony Allard; Music by Hans Zimmer & Rupert Gregson-Williams, Cinematography by Caleb Deschanel, Edited by Wayne Wahman & Tim Squyres. Production companies: Village Roadshow Pictures & Weed Road Pictures, Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures & Village Roadshow.

Starring: Colin Farrell (Peter Lake), Jessica Brown Findlay (Beverly Penn), Jennifer Connelly (Virginia Gamely), William Hurt (Isaac Penn), Maurice Jones (Cecil Mature), Mckayla Twigg (Young Willa), Eva Marie Saint (older Willa), Russell Crowe (Pearly Soames), and Will Smith (Judge).

Rated PG-13 for violence and some sensuality. Running time 118 minutes.

{images belong to Warner Bros Pictures}

"review" · Children's · concenter · Picture book · recommend · Tales

bringing art to life

30 days of pbDay Sixteen:  Brush of the Gods

by Lenore Look and Illus. Meilo So

Schwarz & Wade Books 2013

brush-of-the-gods_cover-imageWhen an old monk attempts to teach young Daozi about the ancient art of calligraphy, his brush doesn’t want to cooperate. Instead of characters, Daozi’s brush drips dancing peonies and flying Buddhas! Soon others are admiring his unbelievable creations on walls around the city, and one day his art comes to life! Little has been written about Daozi, but Look and So masterfully introduce the artist to children.–goodreads

An “Author’s Note” prefaces the story with a brief history of Wu Daozi (689-759) “known as perhaps China’s greatest painter.” Little has been written about him, and Brush of the Gods is “pieced together from references I found in translations of T’ang poetry and essays and from the many know facts about life in Chang’an during T’ang times.”

brush of the gods calligraphyEven at a young age, the classroom was no place for Daozi. He moves his creations into the community, onto the walls, earning and generously dispensing food and wonder for the impoverished. His work becomes increasingly magical, and it is not only the city’s children that become enchanted—the reader is drawn into a sense of awe. Look is eloquent and So’s brushwork likewise. Rendered in watercolor, ink, gouache, and colored pencil, So’s artwork seeks to transport the reader not only into a historical narrative but into an understanding of how captivating art can become.

BrushofGods2Brush_of_gods_spread

Brush of the Gods is a beautiful and inspiring story of a human artist’s restlessness that rewards him his imagination, daring, and charitable life. It took time and perseverance and belief for Daozi–as well as a healthy dose of rebellion; his story encourages the same for the young artist.

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Lenore Look is the award-winning author of numerous children’s books including the popular Alvin Ho series and the Ruby Lu series. Her books have been translated into many languages. She lives in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Meilo So Country of origin- China/ Made in Hongkong/ Packaged in England/ Domiciled in the Shetland Isles/A tangled history/ Or a kind of freedom/ Many cultures make a world citizen/ Not a purist/ Methods and media change as required/ Pen and ink, brush drawing, gouache/ Subjects endlessly varied/ Magic, history, animals, humour, children, sex/ Or a quick sketch from life (via “about“)

Her Children’s Books include: Water Sings Blue by Kate Coombs and Tasty Baby Belly Buttons by Judy Sierra.

{illustrations belong to Meilo So}

"review" · Children's · concenter · Picture book · recommend · Tales

well, maybe…

30 days of pbDay Twelve: Fairly Fairy Tales  

By Esmé Raji Codell, Illustrated by Elisa Chavarri

Aladdin 2011.

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TRC243-4-10 Cover 175L CTP.inddGifted writer and educator Esme Raji Codell has written a book that incorporates fractured fairy tales with this kind of parent-child interplay to create a pitch-perfect combination of bedtime read-aloud and fairytales that will delight children and parents!–goodreads

Most picture book stories about bedtime have similar ingredients:

Kiss? Yes.

Water? Yes.

Bedtime? NOOOOO!

The kid does not want to go to bed.

What if we add a new ingredient to old fairytales? Like solar panels to The Three Little Pigs, or disco to Cinderella. Natalya and I would have had so much fun with this picture book when she was small, because like the boy in the book, she would have taken back the “Nooooo!” and said, “Well, maybe,” too.

fairly fairy graexc_33856969_9781416990864.in01

fairly fairy tale pigFor a new imagination of the story using Codell’s suggested spin, Chavarri illustrates colorful and active double-page scenes for the reader to revisit the classic tales. Going, big, bold, and deceptively simple, Codell and Chavarri are fun and funny—and really smart.

The boy comes to rethink that “Nooooo!” to the question of bedtime, with a “maybe” that changes the age-old story and is willing to entertain possibilities. The boy (and reader) can get excited about story time and opportunities to dream.

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Esmé Raji Codell  is the recipient of a prestigious James Patterson Pageturner Award for spreading the excitement of books in an effective and original way. She has been a keynote speaker for the International Reading Association and the American Library Association, a “virtual” keynote for the National Education Association’s “Stay Afloat!” online conference for first-year teachers, and a featured speaker at the National Museum for Women in the Arts. She has appeared on CBS’s The Early Show, CNN, C-SPAN, and NPR, among other media outlets across the country. The author of How to Get Your Child to Love Reading, as well as five award-winning books for children, Esmé runs the popular children’s literature Web site and the unique literary salon.

Sahara Special (Disney-Hyperion 2003); Sing a Song of Tuna Fish: Hard-to-Swallow Stories from Fifth Grade w/ illus. LeUyen Pham (Hyperion 2004); Hanukkah, Shmaukkah! (Hyperion 2005); Diary of a Fairy Godmother (Disney-Hyperion 2006); Vive la Paris (Hyperion 2006); The Basket Ball w/ illus. Jennifer Plecas (Harry N. Abrams 2011); Seed by Seed: The Legend and Legacy of John “Appleseed” Chapman w/ illus. Lynne Rae Perkins (Greenwillow 2012)

Elisa Chivarri: “My interest in drawing and coloring began before I can remember, but from crayons and finger paints it eventually grew into a fondness of illustrated stories, comics, and animated movies. Because of these loves and my training in classical animation, most of my artwork is story or character driven.”

Born: Lima, PERU | Grew: Alpena, Michigan USA | Education: Savannah Collage of Art & Design, graduated with honors | Major: Classical Animation | Minor: Comics (via “Info”) Books: Santa Goes Green by Anne Margaret Lewis (Mackinac Island Press 2008); Fly Blanky Fly by Anne Margaret Lewis (HarperCollins 2012)