{book} adams’ hitchhiker’s guide

on

{“A Suprised Looking Whale and Bowl of Petunias” by Jonathan Burton}

The daughter is stopping in to share:

The inaccurately named Hitchhiker’s Trilogy.

I find it flabbergasting that one can lay in a field in Innsbruck, Austria, in 1971, being faintly drunk and having a horrible day overall, and brilliantly (though slightly deliriously) come up with a wonderful idea for a book, promptly forget about it for 6 whole years, and still come up with this wonderful, crazy series. I am utterly astonished…. and tempted (not the drunk part; I’m 12). Being a writer myself, I should know that these ideas come to you at the craziest times and that it is vitally important to have something to write on and write with at all times. However, while most writers have ideas at crazy, random moments, few, if any, have the ideas that Douglas Adams possesses. It takes some wicked skill to do what he did. Do you want to know what he did, and what is so fabulous about it? You should, and if you do not, then why did you come and read this blog in the first place?!

First of all (I know, dreadfully boring beginning, right? The boring essay beginning I am firmly against), he begins–or middles–the so-called, “trilogy” with the book, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. It starts us off by introducing his main character: Arthur Dent, a fairly normal English man who is fond of his house, because he lives  in it, loves tea, works at a local radio station, is against bypasses, and has a very strange friend who saves his life, but to his consternation, not his home.

Over the course of the book we meet: Ford Prefect (not a typo for “perfect,” I can assure you), a hitchhiker who got stuck on earth for fifteen years and is the reporter for the biggest, best-selling book, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; Zaphod Beeblebrox, a crazy, froody president of the galaxy with two heads, three arms and an overdeveloped magnetism for trouble; Trillian, a human who got picked up by Zaphod at a party he gatecrashed who is probably the most sane and sensible of the group; Marvin, a depressed robot that was made by the Serious Cybernetics Corporation before they figured out how to make their genuine people personalities actually work; and Eddie, the annoying computer interface to Heart of Gold, a new, one of a kind spaceship that Zaphod just happened to steal. There are other minor characters I could mention at this point, but it might ruin it for you, which might cause you to join up with other discontented readers and spend all of your time plotting how to mob me, which is not suggested. Listing minor characters (however charming they may be) would take up too much space, and it would take a lot more time than I have to spend at this time on minor characters (no matter how amusing they are).

 {another of the talented Jonathan Burton’s illustrations, check out his portfolio and find more of his Hitchhiker’s images here.}

You might notice I am going on many digressions, well so does Douglas Adams in his books and that adds most of the humor, so you might as well get used to them if you want to read his books (which you do!).

<<spoiler alert! If you want to know something about the book that isn’t too big a spoiler in my opinion, but will probably be a spoiler nonetheless, please go to the very bottom of the post and read the asterisked spoiler there! Thank you for your time and consideration. >>

Overall, the first book, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is a story involving the disgusting Vogons and their nasty poetry, some tea, towels, tons of hitchhiking, lots of improbability, a realization that involves mice, and the answer of life, the universe, and everything. Oops, I forgot to add, a whole lot of ridiculousness—maybe you picked up on that though.

PART TWO PEOPLE! Or, the second book.

Now that all that silliness is done, I will move on to his second book, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. This starts off with learning that the main characters are still alive, annoying, and ridiculous as always while they are fleeing from the Vogon construction fleet. Stuck, Zaphod holds a séance to summon his crabby great-great-grandfather, Zaphod the fourth, whom inevitably launches them into an adventure of proportions which include: Frogstar World B, blowing off fate to go to the restaurant at the end of the universe, meeting a bunch of unlikely ancestors, escaping death for the millionth time, and a whole bunch of other nonsense.

PART THREE READERS!

See, that wasn’t so long, now was it? [it is N writing this, after all. ~L] In the next book, Life, the Universe and Everything, our gang of characters are split up; Arthur, living in a cave, being insulted, and slowly going mad on a prehistoric earth; Ford, wandering the same prehistoric earth, until they find each other, chase after a couch, find themselves in a cricket match, and learn about an entirely different, more deadly form of “Krikkit” (which Ford desperately tries to ignore and attempts to find a place to drink and have fun). Meanwhile, Marvin is stuck in a swamp, being dreary as usual, this time determined to depress a very exuberant mattress. At the same time, Zaphod is in a mood and is drinking himself silly to which Trillian responds by teleporting herself randomly somewhere else. Arthur finds himself in a very bewildering encounter with an unknown enemy and learns how to fly, before Trillian, himself and Ford reunite (to Fords delight) at a party, which is, of course, ruined and all four of them find that they are drawn in, whether they like it or not, to save the universe.

Now I’ll warn you, that I could go on forever, because the “trilogy” consists of 5 books, not including And Another Thing by Eoin Colfer, which is the sixth book in the trilogy. Instead of continuing or beginning to talk about each one separately, I’ll just say that they are great. All six books are equally ridiculous and I advise you to read them all.

Douglas Adams was able to lay in a field, a little drunk, and have a crazy thought; through doing this, he created a wonderful series of absurdity, of brilliance, of towels, and extraordinary universe. Reading this series will make you laugh and quote it out loud so many times that people will think that you have finally gone absolutely crazy. Crazy in a good way, I hope.

Here are some tips to being a true, obsessed fan of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.

1. Read it over and over and over and over and over.

42. Repeat.

2. Always, constantly, no matter how many times they tell you to shut up, keep quoting the guide.

3. May 25th is towel day. It celebrates Douglas Adams. Only the geekiest people know about it and celebrate it, and it is celebrated all over the world. All you have to do is carry a towel around with you all day and quote like crazy.

 *the world is utterly destroyed as you know it. Just thought you ought to know.

——————————————————————————————————————————-

The daughter aka N aka Natalya should be a more frequent guest-blogger than she is. When she finally finished the whole Hitchhiker’s Guide series this summer, she agreed to write something and well, it was becoming a series in itself. She surrendered what she had and L  tuned the above “review” a smidge & added images.

The Guide is an experience, and few things make a dinner conversation more interesting than exchanging favorite sequences and quotes from the books. The Guide has an infectious quality, and the symptoms of an outbreak of fandom vary. However, the exposure comes highly recommended, and better earlier than late.

3 Comments Add yours

  1. Jeremy F says:

    HA! Great guest post. I especially liked the tips for being a true obsessed fan. I only recently read The Guide for the first time in my life (actually started it some years ago and didn’t finish for one reason or another), but I intend to follow those tips to the letter 🙂

  2. Okie says:

    Great post.

    I read Guide ages ago and really enjoyed it. I never did read the other books in the series. I really should go back and read them all. Thanks for reigniting my interest. 🙂

    1. L says:

      thanks! we picked up Colfer’s addition but N is the only one to have read it and she assures us he did a great job. we like Colfer, and had confidence, but you know, it just seemed weird at the time, to make that addition.

      I hope you enjoy the Hitchhiker’s experience.

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