BBW-2011-close; RIP, and randomness.

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2011 Banned Books Week is over. I meant to post a wrap-up this weekend but I was appropriately distracted. So here we are. I hope you fit a challenged/banned book in last week. If you’ve read enough, the likelihood is you did, whether intentionally or no; the daily Bible/Scripture readers the biggest supporters against challenging and banning books.

I read Don’t You Dare Read This, Mrs. Dunphrey by Margaret Peterson Haddix; Olive’s Ocean by Kevin Henkes; Angus, Thongs, and Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison; and am still reading The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison. I also read the recently published Shel Silverstein collection of poems and drawings called Every Thing On It, because we love Silverstein and it just showed up on our Library shelves, and because, let’s face it, it will likely be challenged in no time. Hopefully there will be a review to come, at least a post with a few peeks at a few of the poems.

WRITESINGTELLDRAW

I’ve told you a hundred tall stories,

I’ve sung you a thousand sweet songs,

I’ve wrote you a million ridiculous rhymes

(Though sometimes the grammar was wrong).

I’ve drawn you a zillion pictures,

So being as fair as can be,

After all that I’ve writtensungtolddrawn for you,

Won’t you writesingtelldraw one for me?

~Shel Silverstein (Every Thing On It)

Natalya read four books: Tiger Eyes by Judy Blume,  Don’t You Dare Read This, Mrs. Dunphrey by Margaret Peterson Haddix, Monster by Walter Dean Myer (in which she was intrigued by the script format and responded vehemently against the authority figures in the novel) and Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark by Alvin Schwartz. She also read Every Thing On It, mostly aloud when one struck her especially clever, funny–which was the majority.

Now to return our focus to the R(eaders) I(mbibing) P(eril) challenge. We (as a family) have been watching films–re-watching mostly: Coraline (2009), Ghost Busters (1984), and Doctor Who, of course. Sean and I have been watching Luther and I think that television series certainly fits–bloody, grim, and properly horrifying. If I see someone with a Punch mask this halloween I am going to possibly pee my pants and then run.

Hope to be posting some RIP reviews, definitely will increase my RIP reads, and I also have snuck in some 2011 releases onto the reading pile. I finally finished Wildwood by Colin Meloy (juvenile fic), snuck in the latest Lunch Lady by Jarrett J. Krosocszka (juvenile comic series), and am in the opening pages of The Brothers Sisters by Patrick deWitt (a western).

Hope your reading is going well.

Sean is finishing up Love Is a Mix Tape: Life and Loss, One Song at a Time by Rob Sheffield, and I feel I should really work this in. He has been reading excerpts as he goes, laughed out loud numerous times, and has slouched into a mild grieved depression as it is ending. Alan Wise wrote in his review for Esquire, “The inevitable problem is that songs rarely communicate the same emotion to every listener, and too often Sheffield assumes that he and his reader share the same rarified ear.” I think Sean and Sheffield do “share the same rarified ear.” He at least catches the references. Not sure if I will, but there is more to the memoir. And if I read this memoir before the end of the year, I will actually have read two memoirs, two non-fictions this year that were not “required reading.” –just thinking about goals and improving myself…

 

4 Comments Add yours

  1. I’ve got Wildwood waiting for me, but I’ve no clue when I’ll get to it. Was it enjoyable?

    I’ve seen a few of the rock & roll memoirs and what-nots around, but I’ve never thought they sounded interesting. This Love is a Mix Tape, however, does sound somewhat intriguing. I may store that somewhere in my brain for a particular mood and see what happens.

  2. L says:

    Wildwood was enjoyable, a bit slow in ways, and not what I expected, but enjoyable nonetheless.

    we tend to not pick up memoirs of this kind, and I’d read a blog referencing Sheffield’s other book: Talking to Girls About Duran Duran. Sean came to mind immediately. When we went to the Library, I was surprised to find it in Non-Fiction/Biography. The appeal of Mixed-Tape is that it is a memoir involving Sheffield’s late wife. It’s a love story about this man’s connection with music, and his relationship with his wife. It is also a fairly slim volume.

  3. ibeeeg says:

    The book Sean is reading sounds interesting. I do not read much memoir or non-fiction but this one may be good one to help boost that dismal reading area of mine.

    I have decided that my reading has sunk to a low this year so from now on until next year – I am going to read whatever sparks interest at that moment – no more reading lists. that is a huge change for me.

    glad to see that you guys are having a good time watching RIP themed type movies together. You have reminded me to pull out a few of our favorites for this time of the year.

    1. L says:

      would love to hear a female reader’s take on the memoir. I’ve only yet read men’s responses to Sheffield’s books.

      The last place I lived had an awful Library Branch near me, and the two bigger “main” libraries were a hassle to get to, so I would request/hold, browsing from lists and on-line instead of shelves. It has been a good change for me to be able to browse from a shelf, and just taking a book home to read because it peaked my interest. Just the same, right now, all those New Releases I’ve been waiting for are coming in and it tests my initially sparked interest–will I still have the desire to read them?

      Sean and I have been trying to think of films from when we were younger that would fit the RIP theme, also a few classics. Usually we fall into re-watching the same every season–which is comforting, but N is at that age again where she wants to grow into something a little more “for big kids,” heaven help us!

thoughts? would love to hear them...

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